Ellen DeGeneres

The Beats Formula For Streaming Music’s Happy Ending

Close your eyes. Good. Now let me ask you to imagine something. A product that has every song ever recorded, available for you on the devices you use everyday wherever you are, regardless if it’s at home, work, the gym or even places where you don’t have a connection, like the subway or on an airplane. Sounds pretty sweet, right? Any song you can think of, available at your fingertips.

At its crux, that is the promise and marketing pitch for every all-you-can-eat music service that has come out in the past decade. It’s a pretty cool product. And lots of consumers gave it a shot. Only problem is nobody wanted it.

Okay, okay, I’m being a little provocative. When I say ‘nobody’ what I mean is only the most hardcore music nerds—those people who obsess over their playlists and the perfect collection—were willing to pony up the $10 a month. Certainly not the number of people who’ve signed up for other access products, like Netflix or Hulu, or even other music products, like the satellite radio giant Sirius/XM.

Which made it kinda strange when Jimmy Iovine and Dr. Dre’s Beats By Dre headphone juggernaut bought the failing MOG subscription service and planned to relaunch it. Great, just what the industry needed. Another subscription service. But they had another idea.

Jimmy and Dre, along with Chief Creative Officer Trent Reznor, decided that the streaming services had it all wrong. Nobody wants 20 million songs. Music fans want 20 awesome songs for what they were doing in a particular moment. They want them picked and sequenced by someone who knows lots about music. And the company thought that most of all, they want the stamp of approval from a music legend. Like someone who produced one of the greatest rock records. Or an artist/producer who redefined music. Or the lead singer of one of the most innovative bands of all time.

In a nutshell, that’s the Beats Music product. Music designed for the way you listen brought to you by music people you trust. And while the product launched two weeks ago falls well short of delivering those lofty goals, the positioning is so different than the zillion or so other companies now crowding into the space that it might work. Maybe. If Jimmy and Dre can market it like they did headphones.

You see Jimmy and Dre turned headphones—which used to be either a cheap commodity, or a high-end specialty item—into a must-have cultural icon that people would drop $300 without blinking an eye. Why? Not because of quality. Not only because of quality. There have always been high quality players and Beats By Dre headphones don’t always win the best headphone bakeoffs. It’s because everyone you look up to is wearing them. Like Super Bowl champions. And celebrities. And the hottest rappers. When they first launched, it had the stamp of approval of Dre. When he’s recording the next superstar, Beats were the headphones he used. And you could trust him.

So it’s that combination: a differentiated product with an imprimateur that consumers trust, and the marketing muscle to sell it to people who have never heard of Spotify, Rdio or Rhapsody. Beats Music says they’re going to get behind it in a big way. How big? Well, they started with a Super Bowl commercial featuring Ellen DeGeneres. But the company is promising to do much more. And they’ll have to if they want to have a lasting impression, because compared to headphones, marketing streaming services is a tough sell.

So will it work? Can Beats Music extend the Dre-pire and sell the value of streaming music where all the music nerds failed? Yes. If Beats can continue to improve the product so it delivers on the promise of ‘music so right it’s like magic.’ If they can make it effortless to subscribe by adding it to your cellphone bill for cheap. And if they can market it with the sheen and style of Beats By Dre, we will have the hit that the music industry so desperately craves.

More for the obsessively curious

Podcast: Can Beats Music Crack The Mainstream

Spin: Is Beats Music All Its Cracked Up To Be

NY Times: Algorithm For Your Personal Rhythm

Hollywood Reporter: Ellen DeGeneres Reveals Her Super Bowl Ad

NY Post: AT&T Delays Big Push as glitch hits Beats Music