Broken Bells, the project of super producer Danger Mouse and Shins frontman James Mercer, released its second record today. You can go buy After The Disco on Amazon or iTunes. But if you’re one of the many people subscribing to a streaming music service like Spotify, Rdio, Rhapsody or the new entrant into the space, Beats Music, you are out of luck.

Ten bucks a month won't get you the new release by Broken Bells.

$10 a month won’t get you the new Broken Bells on Rdio.

You see the band (or their management) decided to ‘window’ the release, that is allow a time when only people in retail outlets have exclusive access to the record. Why do they do this? The reasons vary. But the prevailing one is that there’s a belief that subscription services are affecting retail sales of the releases. So they believe if fans can’t listen to it on Spotify and the likes, then the fans will be motivated to buy it and then everyone will be happy, right? Not so much.

You see, this infuriates customers of services. They’re paying real money for access to all the music. And when they can’t get a new release by an artist they love, those people at the services hear about it. And while some understand the intricacies of the windowing strategy, most don’t care and rightly so. ‘I subscribe to Rdio. I can’t play it on Rdio. F’ Rdio.’ Need proof of this: look at the Rdio ‘reviews’ on one of the most infamously windowed records, Taylor Swift’s Red

It’s my contention that windowing eats away at the value proposition of streaming music services. Customers sign up expecting that they can play anything released. When that doesn’t materialize the customer asked what the hell they’re exactly buying. Reactions to this problem range from mild irritation to quitting the service.

Let me also point out that the timing of Broken Bells windowing could not be worse. On Sunday Beats Music bought a Super Bowl ad featuring Ellen DeGeneres for their brand new subscription offering. The company is throwing down serious marketing dollars towards the launch. A bundle for a $15 family plan service with AT&T just started. If anyone deserves a pass on this inane business strategy, it is Beats Music.

Artists and management have a bunch of popular misconceptions about streaming services and releases. Let me try to debunk a few of them.

Streaming services are free and I don’t want to give my art away for free. 

While it’s true that Spotify and Rdio have sizable free audiences, Beats Music and Rhapsody are 100% paid customers. So why not hold the release back from the free services and only have it for paid customers of all services?

While I’m no fan of freemium services, the theory goes that every free customer is someone who may one day be so blown away by the experience and value that they’ll end up plunking down their credit card. Removing new releases eats into the value proposition for the service and makes a prospective customer question whether they should subscribe.

What’s the difference between a $10 subscription and a $10 CD?

Customers of streaming are worth a whole hell of alot more than $10. Some services report that their best customers have been with them over two years. That’s $240 in revenue over those two years. Sure some of these people used to be heavy purchasers and they’re getting great deal. But the idea is to build this product with such great value that you’ll grow a huge base of streaming customers who will be around forever. Since Broken Bells self titled released in March 2010 and now, I’ve spent $470 in subscription fees to have access to all the music. If I loved Broken Bells and bought both records, that would have been $20.

Hey, I’m just selling the record on iTunes. They can go buy it if they want to. 

Yeah, that’s true. But let’s be clear about the music consumer in the digital world. It’s a crappy experience. You could be a heavy iTunes downloader and it’s great. But from my years doing product research at Rhapsody, it’s clear that the customer is cobbling together an experience from several different services. Outside of iTunes or Amazon downloads, fans also use a bit of Pandora, maybe use a streaming service, some have a catalog of music. The reasons for this are all over the place, including that the experiences vary widely in ease of use and cost.

But when an artist or management decides to hold it back from streaming the message is clear: I don’t approve of the way you’ve chosen to listen to music. Please change your behavior.

And it might work. A few hardcore fans might go buy the record. Most won’t. Who gets most hurt by this?

The fan.

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Beats Music, Digital Music, marketing, Music, subscription services

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